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Advances in Radio Science An open-access journal of the U.R.S.I. Landesausschuss in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland e.V.

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Adv. Radio Sci., 14, 169-174, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/ars-14-169-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
 
28 Sep 2016
Meteor radar observations of mesopause region long-period temperature oscillations
Ch. Jacobi1, N. Samtleben1, and G. Stober2 1Leipzig Institute for Meteorology, Universität Leipzig, Stephanstr. 3, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
2Leibniz Institute of Atmospheric Physics at the Rostock University, Schloss-Str. 6, 18225 Kühlungsborn, Germany
Abstract. Meteor radar observations of mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) daily temperatures have been performed at Collm, Germany since August 2004. The data have been analyzed with respect to long-period oscillations at time scales of 2–30 days. The results reveal that oscillations with periods of up to 6 days are more frequently observed during summer, while those with longer periods have larger amplitudes during winter. The oscillations may be considered as the signature of planetary waves. The results are compared with analyses from radar wind measurements. Moreover, the temperature oscillations show considerable year-to-year variability. In particular, amplitudes of the quasi 5-day oscillation have increased during the last decade, and the quasi 10-day oscillations are larger if the equatorial stratospheric winds are eastward.

Citation: Jacobi, Ch., Samtleben, N., and Stober, G.: Meteor radar observations of mesopause region long-period temperature oscillations, Adv. Radio Sci., 14, 169-174, https://doi.org/10.5194/ars-14-169-2016, 2016.
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Short summary
VHF meteor radar observations of mesosphere/lower thermosphere daily temperatures have been performed at Collm, Germany. The data have been analyzed with respect to long-period oscillations at time scales of 2 to 30 days. The results reveal that oscillations with periods of up to 6 days are more frequently observed during summer, while those with longer periods have larger amplitudes during winter. The results are comparable with analyses from radar wind measurements.
VHF meteor radar observations of mesosphere/lower thermosphere daily temperatures have been...
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